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NWP Global Registry of Apprentice Ecologists - Drake Park, Farmington, Michigan, USA

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Drake Park, Farmington, Michigan, USA
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treehugger44



Registered: December 2009
City/Town/Province: Farmington
Posts: 1
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My community is host to playgrounds and parks galore, but most are surrounded by simple grass, with very few trees or wild flora. I took part in the Ecologist Apprentice Initiative to help spread health-conscious decisions throughout my community. I reviewed the parks in my area and concluded that Drake Park would be the most ideal area for a new native tree to be planted. Drake Park is central to my community, is adjacent to an elementary school, and is visited daily by dozens of people. It seemed that the park could withstand a new source of shade, as well as a fresh supply of oxygen. By planting a tree there, sound and wind effects would also be reduced and the homes that line the back edge of the park would benefit.
Online, I searched for a list of trees that are native to Michigan and, with the help of a landscaper, circled the trees that would best survive in the park. Meanwhile, I contacted Mr. Gushman, the Director of Public Services for my city. We arranged to meet at Drake Park, where I explained to him the benefits of planting a native tree and he approved a site within the park for the tree to be planted.
Thrilled to have the city’s approval, my family and I drove to our local plant nursery to pick out a tree. We drove home with a red maple sapling and a few bags of wood chips. Later that week, my family and I loaded a shovel, watering can, wood chips, and sapling into our car and drove to the park. I dug a hole sized to the root ball of the sapling and place the tree inside. We then covered the base with dirt and piled the woodchips on top, so that they would help channel water to the roots of the tree. I transplanted the sod that had been removed from the hole and relocated it to an area of the park where it could be put to use.
Now when I walk through Drake Park I smile to see that red maple. It was so simple to get involved and complete my environmental stewardship project, that I feel anyone looking to “go green” should take part. If students, churches, boy scout troops, and families all take an interest in promoting a healthy community, planting trees in yards, in parks, communal areas and even downtown, would be a simple and effective step in improving our city.
· Date: December 28, 2009 · Views: 3426 · File size: 17.0kb, 1178.9kb · : 2160 x 1293 ·
Hours Volunteered: 10
Volunteers: 4
Authors Age & Age Range of Volunteers: 17 & 18-60
Native Trees Planted: 1
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