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NWP Global Registry of Apprentice Ecologists - Apalachicola Basin, Georgia

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Apalachicola Basin, Georgia
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rker3



Registered: October 2009
Posts: 1
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Recognizing the utmost importance of preserving out fragile environment and the devastating consequences for all of humanity if we fail to do so, I was on a mission to not only do my part in protecting our earth, but also encourage others to do so as well. Directing massive efforts to enhance my environment has been a cornerstone of my life ever since I was born. It’s not what I do, it’s who I am. Even as a 7th grader, I started and directed an innovative school-wide recycling program, which was a spectacular success. However, in the fall of 2008, I undertook my most ambitious project of all. I spearheaded a massive community cleanup, but this was not your typical trash removal project, it had a unique twist: it enlisted the help of underprivileged youths in an inner-city youth center in direct collaboration with the elderly citizens at a hospice. The ambitious event was a synthesis for two concepts: educating two particular sector of society about environmental awareness and preservation and translating this newfound awareness into action in a workday. In September, I started enlisting my group of kids from Westside. I organized an initial orientation meting that served as an awareness session. Many of the two dozen teens I recruited had little knowledge about environmental conservation efforts and what it means for our youth. Conducting this mini-class helped inspire them and added meaning to their efforts. I then visited an elderly care center, Eden Court, and recruited volunteers for my cause by giving an enthusiastic speech about my endeavors and goals. The day that was set—October 5th—finally came after weeks of planning and breathless anticipation and was a rousing success. Turnout was much more than anticipated, and the cleanup efforts alongside the upper Apalachicola Basin was a phenomenal success. The area we worked on witnessed a spectacular rejuvenation after the day-long event. Starting at 10 in the morning, the event finally culminated in a barbeque at 6 in the evening to celebrate our successes and our long day of work. At the end of the day, hundreds of large trash bags were filled—the sight of the amount of waste present and our efforts to correct this moved everyone deeply. Unquestionably, my Wilderness Project was a natural outgrowth for my passion and love for the outdoors and preserving our precious earth, yet what made it so much more meaningful was the look in everyone’s eyes at the end of the day, eyes that marked a transformation into a group that had a greater appreciation for environmental stewardship and the activity of preservation. My life has been so much more enriched knowing that I have instilled this appreciation for others, especially two undertargeted groups, the underprivileged and the elderly, fervently hoping to create a domino effect and influence others to start the same. I know that I have done my role, but what’s more, I hope to transfer this love and dedication unto others with projects such as this, an experience that I will truly be forever grateful for.
Date: October 15, 2009 Views: 8720 File size: 25.2kb, 34.9kb : 395 x 336
Hours Volunteered: 568
Volunteers: 75
Authors Age & Age Range of Volunteers: 14 to 71
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