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NWP Global Registry of Apprentice Ecologists - Nantasket Beach, Massachusetts, USA

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Nantasket Beach, Massachusetts, USA
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lnorth17



Registered: December 2016
City/Town/Province: Hanover
Posts: 1
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My project was to increase awareness towards ocean and sea life and the impact of how trash that is thrown onto the beach can destroy marine life that lives in the ocean. I am a senior at Hanover High School and I am plan on majoring in Environmental Science in college in the fall of 2017. Wildlife has always been a huge interest to me and I love learning about it. In my Marine Biology class, we have been studying the human impacts on the ocean and the life that lives in it. I have a heavy heart after learning the things that I did in class. I learned that because of all of the trash that is thrown onto the beach, the ocean life is diminishing. This trash eventually gets into the ocean which is part of the reason why the ocean life is dying. This is a huge issue and many people do not think twice about it. To try to make people think twice about it, my friends and I thought that it would be a great thing to spread awareness about some of the human impacts; such as trash just thrown on the beach by humans.


We thought a good place to make our video and pick up trash would be Nantasket Beach in Hull, MA. This is a large public beach south of Boston, MA. It is a popular beach that many people go to in the summer so we thought there would be a lot of trash left there. We went to the beach and brought a few trash bags and some gloves. We took pictures and videos of us picking up the trash. With the pictures and videos, we made a large video to put on a website that we made to spread awareness of this issue. While we were picking up the trash, some people walking on the beach passed us. As they were walking passed us, they were watching us. Then, they came up to us and told us that we were doing a good thing and to keep it up. That made us feel good about what we were doing. I also thought that using this project on behalf of Nicodemus Wilderness would be another place to increase people's awareness through your website as well as our own website.


Some of the trash that we found was water bottles and plastic bags. These two types of trash were the majority of what we found. Water bottles and plastics bags are really bad and dangerous for marine life. Plastic bags have killed many sea turtles. Sea turtles mistake plastics bags for jelly fish and will eat the bags. Sea turtles are found in this part of the ocean. One plastic bag on the beach means that one sea turtle is subtracted from the population. The person that had left the plastic bag on the beach has caused an innocent sea turtle to die. There are not just sea turtles that live in this part of the ocean, there are dolphins, sharks, fish, and so on. All this sea life's population can be decreased by just five plastic water bottles that are left on the beach.


In addition to making a video and a website, we wanted to financially help an organization that helps save marine life. So we also baked cookies that are dolphin shaped to sell at school. The money that we made from this was given to the Whale and Dolphin Conservation. We not only we were able to give money to help marine life, we made other students in our school aware of the impact trash has on the oceans.


This project has helped me feel more strongly about helping the environment. Also, it had made me want to do even more to help all of the wildlife in the world, even beyond the marine life. It has caused my interest to grow in this field.
Date: December 28, 2016 Views: 294 File size: 19.2kb, 148.0kb Dimensions: 1280 x 960
Hours Volunteered: 24
Volunteers: 4
Authors Age & Age Range of Volunteers: 17 & 18
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