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NWP Global Registry of Apprentice Ecologists - Anacostia Park, Washington, DC, USA

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Anacostia Park, Washington, DC, USA
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Ksears14



Registered: December 2013
Posts: 1
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Over the summer of my junior year, I worked for the Student Conservation Association (SCA) as an intern for the Urban Tree House (UTH). The UTH is an environmental science camp that teaches youth in nature for a 2-3 hour period. This internship required all members to effectively work as a team to educate many students at a time. Groups of kids came from local DC cities and Virginia cities daily. The UTH summer camp taught a variety of activities such as, fishing, river walks with discussion, pollution, trees and wildlife, and various other topics pertaining to environmental education. Volunteering time to educate others in need gives hope and happiness to the less fortunate.
Teaching kids about the importance of the environment was an extraordinary experience; by the end of my term I had received a true understanding of the urban lifestyle. Each day I would explore the city as well as listen to stories told by kids. In particular, on off base teachings were a favorite. A special feature of the UTH, they would dedicate time and money to drive to summer camps who could not afford transportation. On one sweltering day in July our team traveled a more dangerous part of DC. A small town with poorer people, bars on windows, and trash on all corners. As the team arrives, we wonder inside this shanty little building to find kids of all ages with eyes bright as stars. These kids were overjoyed upon our arrival, this camp barely had the money to survive let alone to invite any educational camps. Out of nowhere, a young boy about the age of 5, runs over to me and wraps his arms around my legs filled with excitement. Spending most of my day with the boy, I learned about his rough life growing up in the city. He had several siblings, his dad was out of his family’s life, as a result his mom had to work more than one job to support her family. Though he seemed to be an extremely happy being. He laughed, smiled, and cheered. We became very close that day, he will always remain in my heart. Meeting this jovial five year old, knowing how much of a difficult life he has lived, has inspired me to continue volunteering in the communities around me. I learned that it brings great joy to those less fortunate. Learning about the life of the underprivileged city children, helped me come to realization of how fortunate I truly am. I will continue to work hard to achieve the most successful life possible. I plan to attend college, to obtain a degree.
Throughout my journey in Washington, DC I have learned about city life and how it affects everyone including children and families. This internship has been a blessing to me and local kids in DC. Working in the city has increased my knowledge about new cultures different from what I am used to. Volunteering time to others gives them a sense of hope and happiness.
Date: December 18, 2013 ∑ Views: 4839 ∑ File size: 31.9kb, 226.5kb: 602 x 601 ∑
Hours Volunteered: 45
Volunteers: 8
Authors Age & Age Range of Volunteers: 17 & 15 to 35
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