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NWP Global Registry of Apprentice Ecologists - KM Park Colony, Bhiwani, Haryana, India

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KM Park Colony, Bhiwani, Haryana, India
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Chetany



Registered: December 2020
City/Town/Province: Bhiwani
Posts: 1
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Coming from a major agriculturally active area in India, I've witnessed the dedication and effort it requires to keep the earth in a condition that not only supports the plants but the whole ecosystem. With pollution increasing at an alarming rate along with population, it's high time we start to come up with ideas and plans to keep the earth safe and take enactment on them. Therefore, I always try my best to make the environment safer and encouraging people to do the same through different mediums such as public speaking, film-making, or on-ground projects such as cleaning the polluted areas and then planting trees and plants.
Although my city has a decent amount of trees and greenery it still suffers from pollution and ill practices people knowingly or unknowingly follow. When we moved to my current home, empty land and parks filled with plastics, glass, marbles, and all sorts of waste products caught my eyes. Wanting to do something to make the areas cleaner, I talked with my father and started working on the very polluted land that was part of a much bigger ground that was often used by local carnival festivals which ended up disposing all their garbage at the back end of the park. Moreover, people from nearby areas also used to throw away their waste there and herd mentality followed.
Bringing the vision of transforming making that piece of land into greenery was hard even to imagine, at first, let alone making it real. We started by cleaning the area free of glasses and marbles then later plastic and made a compost of the organic waste. After the area was clean of any sort of litter small water canals were dug for irrigating the plants and trees that were planted later. To make that area what it is today took a lot of effort, time, and money but above all, it took a lot of dedication. Over years many big and small additions have been made such as a rainwater collecting system that directs rainwater from the street to the trees while taking care of the area but since 2020 provided time to think about being more sustainable and doing more than just we've done, this was the next challenge to tackle!
We planted legumes that enrich the soil with nitrates, worked on aeration of the soil, and made the fencing better to keep the area safe. We even did the same process on another empty land piece that used to be littered and planted small vegetable plants. Not only these projects made these areas look pleasant, opposite of what they were, but also made the community a much safer place since the areas were breeding ground for diseases.
We need to realize that just planting trees and cleaning places is not a permanent fix for the ecological imbalance and might even result in adverse effects in long term. I feel that only creating green patches is not enough if we don't think about its sustainability and effect on the future. The whole ride wasn't easy yet, instead of making me and my father tired, made us want to do more to keep our planet clean and healthy. I wish to perfect my automated farming system from my learning in college and deploy it on a larger scale to encourage sustainable farming while aiming to increase the yield and minimizing the waste of resources and the carbon footprint. Over years local authorities have not only praised our work but also personally supported the work which we appreciate a lot but wish and believe this is just a start!
Date: December 31, 2020 Views: 477 File size: 28.3kb, 915.3kb : 1564 x 1564
Hours Volunteered: 400
Volunteers: 4
Authors Age & Age Range of Volunteers: 18 to 51
Area Restored for Native Wildlife (hectares): 0.5
Native Trees Planted: 190
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